Be the Change, Stop Bullying & Cyberbullying

Traditional Bullying

In 2015, about 21% of students ages 12–18 reported being bullied at school during the school year (U.S. Department of Education & U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs, 2017).

Of students who reported being bullied at school in 2015, about 19% reported that bullying had somewhat or a lot of negative effect on how they felt about themselves, 14% each reported that bullying had somewhat or a lot of negative effect on their relationships with friends or family and on their school work, and 9% reported that bullying had somewhat or a lot of negative effect on their physical health (U.S. Department of Education & U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs, 2017).

The percentage of public schools that reported student bullying occurred at least once a week decreased from 29% in 1999–2000 to 16% in 2013–14 (U.S. Department of Education & U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs, 2017).

In 2014, about 15% of 3rd grade students reported that they were frequently teased, made fun of, or called names by other students; 22% were frequently the subject of lies or untrue stories; 14% were frequently pushed, shoved, slapped, hit, or kicked; and 15% were frequently excluded from play on purpose (U.S. Department of Education & U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs, 2017).

In 2015, about 5% of students ages 12–18 reported that they avoided at least one school activity or class or one or more places in school because they thought someone might attack or harm them (U.S. Department of Education & U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs, 2017).

During the 2013–14 school year, 25% of public schools reported student bullying occurred at least once a week was higher for middle schools than high schools and combined schools (17%) (U.S. Department of Education & U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs, 2017).

Research suggests that being bullied has similar and in some cases worse long-term adverse effects on young adults’ mental health than being maltreated (Lereya, Copeland, Costello, & Wolke, 2015).

Nearly 1 in 3 students (27.8%) report being bullied during the school year (National Center for Education Statistics [NCES], 2013).

The National Crime Victimization Survey of the 2011 school year found that 27.8% of students (ages12-18) reported being bullied at school, while 9% reported being cyberbullied anywhere (NCES, 2013).

Of the students that reported being bullied in the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCES, 2013):

  • 64.5% said it was once or twice in the school year
  • 18.5% said once or twice a month
  • 9.2% said once or twice a week
  • 7.8% said almost every day

 

Of the students in the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCES, 2013):

  • 17.6% reported being made fun of, called names or insulted
  • 18.3% had rumors spread about them
  • 5.0% were threatened with harm
  • 7.9% were pushed, shoved, tripped, or spit on
  • 3.3% were tried to make do things they did not want to do
  • 5.5% were excluded from activities on purpose
  • 2.8% had their property destroyed on purpose

 

The Urban Institute’s study on bullying revealed 17% students reported being victims of cyberbullying, 41% reported being victims of physical bullying, and 45% reported being victims of psychological bullying  (Zweig, Dank, Lachman & Yahner, 2013).

Students from the Urban Institute’s study on bullying reported (Zweig, Dank, Lachman & Yahner, 2013)

  • 25% of students reported they experienced bullying on school grounds.
  • 23% reported the bullying happened during the school day.
  • 15% reported they experienced at least one type of bullying (cyber, physical, and/or psychological) at school once a month or more.

 

School-based bullying prevention programs decrease bullying by up to 25% (McCallion & Feder, 2013)

Almost all forms of bullying peak in middle school and then decrease in tenth grade (Zweig, Dank, Lachman & Yahner, 2013).

The Urban Institute’s study on bullying revealed that 17% of bullying victims sought help after being victimized. Females were twice as likely to have sought help as males (Zweig, Dank, Lachman & Yahner, 2013)

  • 71% of help-seekers turned to their parents
  • 56% turned to friends
  • 38% turned to school counselors 
  • 35% turned to teachers

 

Different types of bullying are more prevalent based on gender (Zweig, Dank, Lachman & Yahner, 2013):

  • 50% of female students have experienced psychological bullying, compared to 39% of male students.
  • 45% of male students have experienced physical bullying, compared to 37% of female students. 
  • 23% of females reported cyberbullying victimization, compared to 11% of males.

 

In 2011, about 36% of students who reported bullying problems at school indicated that they occurred at least once or twice a month (U.S. Department of Education & U.S. Department of Justice of Justice Programs, 2013).

In 2011, students who reported being bullied notified an adult after being bullied only 40% of the time and only 26% of the time after being cyberbullied (U.S. Department of Education & U.S. Department of Justice of Justice Programs, 2013).

A higher percentage of public school students (28%) reported bullying situations at their schools than students in private schools (21%) (U.S. Department of Education & U.S. Department of Justice of Justice Programs, 2013).

During the 2009-2010 school year, 23% of public schools reported that bullying occurred among students on a daily or weekly basis (U.S. Department of Education & U.S. Department of Justice of Justice Programs, 2013).

Students who experience bullying are at increased risk for depression, anxiety, sleep difficulties, and poor school adjustment (Center for Disease Control [CDC], 2012).

Students who experience bullying are twice as likely as non-bullied peers to experience negative health effects such as headaches and stomachaches (Gini & Pozzoli, 2013).

12 months prior to the 2011 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey , 20.1% of students had been bullied on school property (U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, 2011).

  • The prevalence of having been bullied on school property was higher among females (22.0%) than males (18.2%) students.
  • The prevalence of having been bullied on school property was higher among white (22.9%) than black (11.7%) and Hispanic (17.6%) students.
  • The prevalence of having been bullied on school property was higher among 9th grade (24.2%) and 10th grade (22.4%) students than 11th grade (17.1%) and 12th grade (15.2%) students.

 

30 days prior to the 2011 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey, 5.9% of students had not gone to school because they felt they would be unsafe at school or on their way to or from school at least 1 day (U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, 2011).

In 2011, approximately 28% of 12-18 year old students reported being bullied at school, and 9% of 12-18 year old students reported being cyberbullied anywhere during the school year (U.S. Department of Education & U.S. Department of Justice Programs, 2013).

  • 18% reported that they were made fun of
  • 18% reported being subject of rumors
  • 5% reported being threatened with harm
  • 3% reported that others tried to make them do things they did not want to do
  • 6% reported being excluded from activities on purpose
  • 3% reported that their property was destroyed by others on purpose
  • 8% said they were pushed, shoved, tripped, or spit on

 

School staff reported that verbal (59%), social/relational (50%), and physical (39%) forms were of greater concern in their school than cyberbullying (17%(National Education Association [NEA], 2011).

NEA members reported that bullying based on a student’s weight (23%), gender (20%), perceived sexual orientation (18%), or disability (12%) were of concern in their school (NEA, 2011).

Although the vast majority of school employees (93%) reported that their district had implemented a bullying prevention policy, just over half of all staff (54%) had received training related to the policy (NEA, 2011).

Over 80% of school staff felt their district’s policy was adequate (NEA, 2011).

Although school staff reported a willingness to intervene in bullying situations, less than 40% of staff reported being directly involved in formal bullying prevention activities (NEA, 2011).

43% percent of NEA members perceived bullying to be a moderate or major problem at their school, over half of the members surveyed (62%) indicated they witnessed bullying 2 or more times in the last month. 41% indicated they had witnessed bullying once a week or more (NEA, 2011).

The reasons for being bullied reported most often by students were looks (55%), body shape (37%), and race (16%) (Davis and Nixon, 2010).

64% of children who were bullied did not report it; only 36% reported the bullying (Petrosina, Guckenburg, DeVoe, & Hanson, 2010).

 

 


 

Traditional Bullying in Missouri

A majority (61.9%) of youth in Missouri reported making fun of other people and 6.4% reported doing this 40 or more times in the past three months (Missouri Department of Mental Health, 2012).

Exactly 30% of the students surveyed reported that they had been bullied on school property (Missouri Department of Mental Health, 2012).

Of 42 states and the District of Columbia, Missouri had the highest rate of high school bullying on school property (Bernardo, 2015).

Missouri was ranked 28 out of 43 (worse than 65% of other evaluated states) with regard to negative environmental impact due to bullying in schools (Bernardo, 2015).

On average, Missouri was ranked as the 41st worst state (out of 43) controlling bullying in high schools (Bernardo, 2015).


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