Be the Change, Stop Bullying & Cyberbullying

Crime, Violence, & Law Enforcement

48 school associated violent deaths were reported from 2013-14, which included 26 homicides, 20 suicides (compared with 1,645 total suicides of school-age youth that occurred in 2013), 1 legal intervention death (U.S. Department of Education & U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs, 2017).

During the 2013–14 school year, 65% of public schools recorded that 1 or more incidents of violence had taken place (approximately 757,000 crimes), which translates to approximately 15 crimes per 1,000 students enrolled (U.S. Department of Education & U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs, 2017)

In 2015, about 6% of students in grades 9–12 reported that they had been threatened or injured with a weapon on school property (U.S. Department of Education & U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs, 2017).

During the 2014–15 school year, there were 1,500 reported firearm possession incidents at schools in the US, and the rate of firearm possession incidents was 3 per 100,000 students (2 states had rates above 10: Missouri and Arkansas) (U.S. Department of Education & U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs, 2017).

12% of students who reported being afraid of attack or harm at school in 1995 decreased to 3% in 2015, which involved a higher percentage of female students than of male students, Hispanic students than of White students, and students in urban and suburban areas than of students in rural areas (U.S. Department of Education & U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs, 2017)

Based on the National Crime Victimization Survey (National Center for Education Statistics [NCES], 2013):

  • 10.3% of bullied students feared attack or harm, versus 1 .2% of non-bullied students. 
  • 11.1% of bullied students engaged in a physical fight, versus 2. 1% of non-bullied students.
  • 4.8% of bullied students carried a weapon, versus 1 .6% of non-bullied students. 

 

In 2009–10, about 74% of public schools recorded one or more violent incidents, 16% recorded one or more serious violent incidents, and 44% recorded one or more thefts (Indicators of School Crime and Safety, 2013).

7% of students in 9-12th grade reported being threatened or injured with a weapon (i.e. gun, knife, or club) on school property as of 2011 (U.S. Department of Education & U.S. Department of Justice of Justice Programs, 2013).

In 2011, a higher percentage of students (ages 12-18) reported that they were afraid of attack or harm at school than away from school during the school year (U.S. Department of Education & U.S. Department of Justice of Justice Programs, 2013).

Between 2010 and 2011, the rate of violent victimization against students increased from 17 to 24 violent victimization per 1,000 students at school (U.S. Department of Education: National Center for Education Statistics, 2013).

48% of law enforcement agencies report the time spent investigating bullying, school violence or cyberbullying has increased over the past 2 years (Thomson Reuters, 2013).

51% of law enforcement agencies spend less than 5% of their time investigating cyberbullying, bullying, and school violence (Thomson Reuters, 2013).

The top categories law enforcement agencies face include online harassment (62%) and cyberbullying (52%) (Thomson Reuters, 2013).

Top technologies law enforcement agencies report being used are smartphones, texting, and Facebook (Thomson Reuters, 2013).

68% of law enforcement agencies foster relationships with school officials and principals to prevent or deter cyberbullying, bullying, or school violence (Thomson Reuters, 2013).

Most law enforcement agencies feel ill-equipped to effectively investigate issues of cyberbullying, bullying, and instances of school violence. 76% believe current training on cyberbullying is insufficient (Thomson Reuters, 2013).

Most valuable types of information in cyberbullying investiations includes public records (27%), internal law enforcement data (25%), and classified documents (24%) (Thomson Reuters, 2013).

Top barriers to cyberbullying investigations include lack of personnel (48%), lack of technology (30%), and legal concerns (28%) (Thomson Reuters, 2013).

In the 30 days preceding the 2011 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey, 5.4% of students had carried a weapon (e.g. knife, gun, or club) onto school property at least 1 day (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2011).

In the 12 months preceeding the 2011 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2011):

  • 7.4% of students nationwide in the U.S. had been threatened or injured with a weapon (e.g. knife, gun, or club) on school property 1 or more times.
  • 32.8% of students had been in a physical fight 1 or more times.
  • 12.0% of students had been in a physical fight on school property 1 or more times.

 

During the 2009-2010 school year, 85% of public school reported that 1 or more crimes had taken place at school, totaling an estimated 1.9 million crimes (U.S. Department of Education & U.S. Department of Justice of Justice Programs, 2013).

Students who bully others are at increased risk for substance use, academic problems, and violence later in adolescence and adulthood (Center for Disease Control, 2012).

 

 


 

Crime, Violence and Law Enforcement in Missouri 

While the majority of youth did not report rebellious and defiant attitudes, almost half (48.7%) of the youth strongly agreed or agreed that fighting back is acceptable if one is provoked (Missouri Department of Mental Health, 2012).

The highest percentage of youth reported that it would be very hard to get a gun; however, over 1 in 3 youth (36.5%) think it would be easy or very easy (Missouri Department of Mental Health, 2012).

Almost half (45.6%) of all youth did not believe that a youth carrying a gun in their neighborhood would be caught by the police (Missouri Department of Mental Health, 2012).


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