Be the Change, Stop Bullying & Cyberbullying

Bullying Intervention

During 2015-16, about 76% of public schools reported providing training for classroom teachers or aides on recognizing physical, social, and verbal bullying behaviors (NCES, 2018).

A greater percentage of public middle schools than of high schools and primary schools reported providing training on discipline policies and practices for all types of bullying (NCES, 2018).

Bullied youth were most likely to report that actions that accessed support from others made a positive difference (Davis & Nixon, 2010).

Actions aimed at changing the behavior of the bullying youth (fighting, getting back at them, telling them to stop, etc.) were rated as more likely to make things worse (Davis & Nixon, 2010).

Students reported that the most helpful things teachers can do are: listen to the student, check in with them afterwards to see if the bullying stopped, and give the student advice (Davis & Nixon, 2010).

Students reported that the most harmful things teachers can do are: tell the student to solve the problem themselves, tell the student that the bullying wouldn’t happen if they acted differently, ignored what was going on, or tell the student to stop tattling (Davis & Nixon, 2010).

As reported by students who have been bullied, the self-actions that had some of the most negative impacts (telling the person to stop/how I feel, walking away, pretending it doesn’t bother me) are often used by youth and often recommended to youth (Davis & Nixon, 2010).


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